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Lake Lenore Caves

Located in central Washington, the Lake Lenore Caves are a nice place to relax and catch some awesome views.  Hiking up the path from the parking lot, the trails are well defined and easy to follow.  Concrete stairs lead to the top of a section of basalt, and the trails splits at that point.  The easier terrain to navigate leads to the right, while also offering a more direct route to the caves.  The caves are very easy to find, as the trail leads right to them.  They are not extremely expansive by any means, but the caves are large enough for a group to sit and eat lunch or find a cool spot to rest for a bit.  Some more challenging landscapes are off to the left, and hikers should lead with caution when walking that path.  From what I understand, there are signs posted at points to show some dangerous areas that are not recommended for hiking.  Another thing hikers should keep in mind is to be on the lookout for rattlesnakes, as pointed out by the Washington Trails Association.

 

Geologically this area was formed during the last ice age, during a time of immense flooding.  Torrential waters raced through the area, and ripped away chunks of basalt creating many of the ravines that can be found in Washington state.  Since then, the natural process of water getting into crevices in the basalt then repeatedly freezing and warming have hollowed out the caves.  The caves also bear a bit of a social history also, as natives were known to utilize them close to 5,000 years ago.  It is thought the caves were seasonal shelters, in which some of the natives would live and work there gathering plants, fish, and other supplies.  Spring and Summer would have been the most active, but as the seasons changed the natives would return to the permanent villages.  As mentioned on the website Only in Your State, some of the native petroglyphs can still be found along the walls.

 

Standing on the ridgeline, visitors can catch great views of Lake Lenore below which has a bit of an interesting story as well.  As explained by Heather Carr on Insteading.com the lake was once thought to be uninhabitable.  It was thought the geology of the area created an alkaline ph in the water that wouldn’t support life, so the military actually used it for a dumping ground at one point in time.  In 1947 the War Assets Administration had to dispose of 10 tons of metallic sodium, and they couldn’t find anyone willing to risk transporting it.  So the decision was made to drop the stuff into Lake Lenore, because the reaction would destroy the sodium.  Once the metallic sodium reacted with water, it would explode and release sodium hydroxide, hydrogen gas, and a lot of heat.

Here is a link to a YouTube video showing the disposal:  The Disposal of Sodium, 1947

 

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Hiking Hog Lake

This nice little landscape will take you through various scenes along the trail.  The main looping trail here is a pretty easy hike, as the main loop is under 2 miles.  There are other pathways that explorers can use to extend this hike a bit, and some of them skirt right along the lake’s edge.  The terrain is easily manageable in most areas, but can become muddy in spots.  As hikers progress along the trail, there will be notices of private property and trail users should respect those notices.  The best time to hike through the area is early to mid Spring, as the wildflowers will be coloring the hillsides.  The Washington Trails Association points out that Arrowleaf Balsamroot will be plentiful in the Spring, and that is also the best time to see the other wildflower varieties. The waterfall will also be at it’s strongest flow during this time of year.

The lake is open in the Winter for fishing as well, as it opens the Friday after Thanksgiving as stated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.  It is a relatively popular trail, and can be used by people of any skill level as suggested by AllTrails.com.  The trails out there are great for dogs but keep them on a leash and keep them away from the edge of the higher cliffs.  Hikers will also be able to potentially see a variety of songbirds and larger wildlife.  Deer have been seen in the area, and once in a while a coyote is spotted.  Smaller mammals such as squirrels, chipmunks, and other animals can be spotted along the trails as well.  Visitors should also be aware that insects and spiders will also be found as the weather warms up.  Hikers may also encounter some smaller snakes on the rocks overlooking the lake, and the vast beauty continues throughout the entire hike.

There are no fees or passes required to visit the area, which is another great reason to visit Hog Lake.  The trails are all pretty easy to identify and follow, although as mentioned on The Washington Trails Association it is possible to become confused with some of the cattle trails that scatter the hillside.  As I mentioned above however there are property boundary signs, which are private property markers for the farms surrounding the area.  That is also the reasoning for some of the gates people may encounter along their journey at Hog Lake.  A trip report on theoutbound.com mentions those same gates, but goes on to mention the incredible views to be encountered along the trails.  Also claiming that some of the best landscape photos can be taken on the ridge-lines that carry the trail along the cliff’s edge.  It is truly an experience to make time for, and one that will be sure to create a great hiking adventure.

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